You can’t win if you don’t cross the finish line.

Fear. Fear of flying. Fear of failing. Fear of not being good enough. Fear of rejection. It is part of the creative process. Some people do not fear anything, yet still fail due to their inability to hear or understand constructive criticism.

Others create projects but constantly revise them or just walk away from their finished endeavor after a few critical reviews because they are afraid.

In order to succeed, whether in baseball, writing, or building an empire, failure is an integral part of learning and growing.

In baseball, batters are considered successful when they reach base safely 30% of the time, and that does not include walks or the times that the other team screws up. 40% is awesome. A consistent 50% is unheard of.

A return on an investment over 20% is suspect or fraught with risk.

In order to be published, even by yourself, you have to go all the way and break through or put aside your fear. No mister in-between. That means listening to and analyzing input form critique groups, hiring an editor, and taking the time to step back and then revisit your work with a fresh, unbiased eye.

And when those people say, it isn’t right, or that your work is not easily identified as a genre, or that your delivery is off-beat. You will have to make the decision whether to bend to conventional wisdom or try to sell, then perhaps do it yourself. Only after you have done it all and crossed the finish line, not the halfway mark, will you know you did your best.

Because you can’t win unless you go the entire course all the way to the real finish line.

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About 3by3 writing method

The author of 12 books, half of them textbooks, two novels and three self help. has struggled with his challenges of completion, distractions, plotting and writers block. Finally after getting stopped I stopped and analyzed what was going on and spent a lot of introspection, research and reading trying to locate the source of these issues. The result of was the 3by3 writing method - a three step program to start and then continue the process of completing a story all the way to publication.
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